All News

Former F1 Boss Max Mosley Took His Own Life After Learning He Had Only ‘Weeks’ Left To Live

Nearly a year after ex-Formula One boss Max Mosley’s death in May of 2021, and authorities have concluded that the tycoon and former racing driver killed himself after learning that he had only weeks to live following several months of treatment for cancer. He was 81 years old.

According to BBC News, during an inquest into Mosley’s death, senior Coroner Dr. Fiona Wilcox told Westminster Coroner’s Court that the cause was a gunshot wound to the head, and stated that she was “entirely satisfied Mr. Mosley would not have undertaken this action but for the distressing and debilitating terminal lymphoma.”

In 2019, doctors informed Mosley he had “very limited life expectancy” after developing diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, cancer that affects the immune cells. The night before he died, Mosley contacted his personal assistant to inform them of his intentions, had a final meal with his wife, and wrote a suicide note.

Mosley was head of the FIA from 1993 to 2009, and during his time was able to make significant contributions to the safety of F1, which he considered to be his greatest achievement. Slower speeds and increased safety regulations dramatically decreased the danger of the sport, following the deaths of Ayrton Senna and Roland Ratzenberger at Imola in 1994.

Upon hearing about Mosley’s death, current FIA boss Bernie Ecclestone said it was “like losing a brother”. He added, “He did, a lot of good things not just for motorsport, also the [car] industry. He was very good in making sure people built cars that were safe.”

His final year as FIA boss would be tainted with controversy, however, as tabloid News of the World reported that he hosted a Nazi-themed sex party. While he admitted to the latter, the allegation that the party was Nazi-themed was found to be false, and he was awarded a £60,000 settlement from the publication.

Source

Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button